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eswiftfire
RE: Favorite Author

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Saturday February 26, 2005 6:19 PM
Oh yeah! Neil Gaiman rules!
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TheShadowlord
RE: Favorite Author

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Monday February 28, 2005 4:36 AM
Not to sound nasty or mean or anything, Suzine, but you have Rowling in the same league as Tolkien, Pratchett, Gaiman?

(and Martin, though he isn't in the same leauge as the Three, he's WAAAAY better than Rowling)

My problems with Harry Potter are legion.
No, it is NOT good world building. The plot holes are big enough to shove aircraft carriers through.
E.g. how come nearly all wizards are bloody ignorant when it comes to the most elementary aspects of 'muggle' life? They supposedly live in much of the same world, yet, even those who are supposed to work with mundanes don't know heads or tales of a toothbrush (postal sevice, cars, guns, telephones, electric appliances in general), yet their houses, as evidenced by the Weasels' place, is built and organized and has facilities much along the same line as any others.
This is also ignoring things like satellites, spy planes and normal aircraft that could and should be seeing wizards on brooms and flying cars and teleporting buses all over the place, but no.
The multitude of mythic monsters running about the place and the overuse of magic here and there would require the 'clean-up crews' to number in the tens of thousands and work overtime to fix all the (to use a V:tM term) Masquerade breaches.
There must be some serious mind-numbing magic going around the place to keep us mundanes ignorant, and this goes way beyond any power that has been evidenced in the books.
AS far as good characters go, this is admittedly a matter of taste, but the only half-way interesting character is Snape, imo, and he's waaaay cooler in the films than in the books.
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I feel happy...I feel happy!

"I contend that we are both atheists. I just believe in one fewer god than you do. When you understand why you dismiss all the other possible gods, you will understand why I dismiss yours."
- Stephen Roberts
 Message #261581 - This was a reply to message #261465
Suzine
RE: Favorite Author

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Monday February 28, 2005 9:23 AM
QUOTED  Not to sound nasty or mean or anything, Suzine, but you have Rowling in the same league as Tolkien, Pratchett, Gaiman?

(and Martin, though he isn't in the same leauge as the Three, he's WAAAAY better than Rowling)

Did I ever say anything about 'league'? The topic was favorite authors. If you told me it was an author!deathmatch, I'd have alerted the boys over at fandom_wank.
And yes, I do consider Rowling a good author- better then many other fantasy authors I've had the misfortune to stumble on.

QUOTED  No, it is NOT good world building. The plot holes are big enough to shove aircraft carriers through.

Out of sheer morbid curiosity, what do you think of Robert Jordan's world-building in Wheel of Time? Because he brings "illogical world" to a whole new level.

You do realize you brought this upon yourself, I should hope. Beware the long-time residents of the HP fandom

QUOTED  how come nearly all wizards are bloody ignorant when it comes to the most elementary aspects of 'muggle' life? They supposedly live in much of the same world, yet, even those who are supposed to work with mundanes don't know heads or tales of a toothbrush (postal sevice, cars, guns, telephones, electric appliances in general)

I live in the same land- a relatively short distance- from Beduine, Druz and traditional Muslim people who live in villages and tent-camps, have visited in the past and know people among them. Yet I know very little about their daily lives, and if you told me to build a tent or mount a horse/camel, I wouldn't have a clue. Do you know about the daily lives and habits of people of a different culture and habits, unless you actually live among them? I'm not gonna fling quotes at you; try this essay, if you like.

QUOTED  yet their houses, as evidenced by the Weasels' place, is built and organized and has facilities much along the same line as any others.

Like what? Plumbing? I don't recall them having a microwave or a TV- IIRC, it's never mentioned that their WWW is radio-waves based, they move by apparating/floo, and magically enhance the cars (bigger on the inside, can move without gas- as shown in CoS).
And why would they need to know about post/phones/guns? They've got magic, which works quite nicely I'd say. Another essay. And another one.

QUOTED  This is also ignoring things like satellites, spy planes and normal aircraft that could and should be seeing wizards on brooms and flying cars and teleporting buses all over the place, but no.

There are Muggle-repelling charms mentioned. The British prime-minister is supposed to be aware of the WW- and it has been mentioned that electronic devices are damaged by magical energy (in GoF, IIRC).

QUOTED  The multitude of mythic monsters running about the place and the overuse of magic here and there would require the 'clean-up crews' to number in the tens of thousands and work overtime to fix all the (to use a V:tM term) Masquerade breaches.

There are new species being found now- in spite of humanity investigating every corner of the Earth for over a century now. And yes, I do mean animals, not bacteria.
And in PoA it's mentioned that Muggles can't see Dementors. It's not such a strech of the imagination to assume that other creatures are invisible too (Thestrals, for example), or able to disguise themselves (Veela, Boggart, Grim, and the Lexicon mentions that 'Hippogriff owners are required to keep them under Disillusionment Charms to prevent Muggles from seeing them'), and some creatures only live near wizards (Ghouls, Gnomes, House-Elves, Golblins, Hags).
And CoS, PoA, GoF and OotP all mention various magical 'teams' whos job it is to keep Muggles from noticing the WW.

QUOTED  There must be some serious mind-numbing magic going around the place to keep us mundanes ignorant, and this goes way beyond any power that has been evidenced in the books.

I've mentioned enough, I think. Kindly specify, as I don't share your opinion.

Good places to answer whatever you'd like to know about HP are Red Hen Publications and HP Essays.

QUOTED  AS far as good characters go, this is admittedly a matter of taste, but the only half-way interesting character is Snape, imo, and he's waaaay cooler in the films than in the books.

In your opinion. Not mine. And the movies? Please.

[[Edited by Suzine on Monday February 28, 2005 9:27 AM]]
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Personally, I think that if Anne Rice had even one ounce more of hot air inside her, she'd float gently towards the heavens and disappear into space. Not that it would necessarily be a bad thing. -FW
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TheShadowlord
RE: Favorite Author

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Thursday March 3, 2005 4:05 AM
First off, don't get me started on RJ. He has some nifty ideas, ideas which I like much more than HP, but the whole is rather painful.


QUOTED  I live in the same land- a relatively short distance- from Beduine, Druz and traditional Muslim people who live in villages and tent-camps, have visited in the past and know people among them. Yet I know very little about their daily lives, and if you told me to build a tent or mount a horse/camel, I wouldn't have a clue. Do you know about the daily lives and habits of people of a different culture and habits, unless you actually live among them?


Except you do know that these people exist, you know that they have tents, and camels and stuff and know what they are used for. These people know you exist and know at least of the existance of cars and funny little technological things even if they probably don't know an Ipod from a camera.
Now I'm a bit shaky on HP stuff, but do the wizards actually live in their own little ghettoes isolated from the mundanes? Or do they magically ignore everything around them while putting out a rather impressive 'ignore me' aura? I'm not getting at them for not knowing how to operate every piece of tech junk that exists, though it seems odd to me that even magical kids wouldn't be interested, but their total ignorance of the most basic aspects of life in modern England.

The point about the Weasel's house was maybe a bit hastily made, except that the people who designed it must have had some basic idea of modern house design and conviences. It seems as though the wizards would still live in the dark ages if the odd weirdo hadn't looked at the mundanes and thought "y'know, this 'indoor plumbing' is a nifty idea".


The 'magic messes with tech' bit. Magic messes with tech? Ok, to what extent? Is there any basis in the books for the assumption made in the second essay you listed (I wish these people would post where they get their info from; it makes it damn difficult to check their facts if all you get is 'x said y' with nothing else)?
It says that Hermione claimed that certain things, like radios, won't work. What kind of radios, the common cheap shit or the powerful military versions? what kind of other things don't work?
Without this information, simply assuming that most everything won't work is as stupid as assuming that everything but radios will.
And the quote about electronics being damaged by magic, if you please?
If we assume that the essay is right about the 'waste energy' going to EM, shouldn't it stand to reason that this energy ruins stuff in a wide area around it, leading to mundanes asking questions like "who the hell is setting off all these EMPs that fuck our stuff up?" And if the EMP isn't that powerful, our tech should work rather well in most circumstances. This is assuming, of ourse, that the wizards don't have extradimensional pockets they all live in, which by the standards of the books seems like quite a bit more powerful magic than most of them can toss around. What about when Harry whupped that Duh-mentor [Sluggy Freelance' s take on the whole HP thing is brilliant], I can't remember any streetlights being ruined, or the area blacking out, which is what the essay implies should happen if Harry is off flinging that powerful 'scare the Nazghul rip-off' spell of his. (Father-somethingorother?)

Muggle-repelling charms. Great. What are their specs? How many, what range, AoE, etc.? Do they work on tech? Do they work through tech? Unless you have answers to the rest, it is just as logical to assume they only work on people in person but leave wizards exposed to tech surveillance as to assume they work on everything.

Thousands of new species are being discovered? fine, but you are aware that most of them are plants and insects and small creatures that stay out of the way of civilization?
Dragons and giants and stuff are a different matter. I think most Norwegians would notice if there were big nasty reptiles wandering around, even if they are in places like Finnmarksvidda and Hardangervidda. Don't they need to eat? Oh, I guess that all the dead sheep that we so foolishly blame on wolverines, wolves, bears etc really fell victim to dragons.

Disillusionment charms on animals are all well and good for tame ones. I believe it was mentioned when Hagrid got his hippogriff that there were at least a few still in the wild. In any case, that one Weasly was off looking for dragons in the wilds, wasn't he?
I know there are 'clean-up crews', I'm just saying that they must number many and work a helluva lot to take care of these things. Sure, a few mundanes always slip through, but let's face it, if any of us heard people talking about monsters and ghosts and stuff we would think they were crazy, and say so (though for some reason, supernatural creator forces are socially acceptable and generally not subject to speculations on the believer's sanity. But that's a discussion for another time). No reason to believe that the odd person can't avoid the cleaners and be ignored by the magical community in general. Yet these people must be the oddities in the magical community in order to clean things up effectively without somehow messing things up through their ignorance of the mundane world.

It is mentioned in one of the HP books, the one where Harry gets his invisibility cloak, that invisibility was pretty impressive magic for wizards to master. I get the idea that specialized items can often put out more powerful effects than a wizard can manage on his/her own, so that doesn't get me. But unless wizards have a built in- field of 'ignore me' magic, or items to do the same (something that the rules against using magic in mundane areas would seem to disprove) they should have been discovered ages ago.

I'll probably want to come back and edit a few things, but I don't have time now.
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I feel happy...I feel happy!

"I contend that we are both atheists. I just believe in one fewer god than you do. When you understand why you dismiss all the other possible gods, you will understand why I dismiss yours."
- Stephen Roberts
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Alvanna
RE: Favorite Author

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Wednesday August 17, 2005 3:14 PM
You have gotta love the Harry potter books and the lord of the rings books but there is a series That I love more then any other! They are by Tamora Pierce! She has 22 books in all.

There is the Song of the Lioness series (4). Alanna strives to become the first female knight in almost 100 years. There is one problem though, girls are not aloud to become pages. So she dresses up like her twin brother and they switch places(she goes to become a knight and he goes to become a mage). But as one man tries to take the throne Alanna will have to face her fears and kill all that oppose.

The Immortals series (4). A time of peace passes after Alanna is turned into the Kings knight. But trouble is brewing and immortals are 'set loose' over an unsuspecting land. But one girl has a power to help restore the balance of nature. Daine Sarrasri, wild Mage.

Protector of the Small series (4). It has been 10 years sence the Law was made saying Girls where allould to be pages. But nun had stepped forward un til Keladry of Mindelan arrived. When war brakes loose she is sent a vision and she is the only one who has the power to stop the terror that has come forth.

Her newest 2 novles are Tricksters choice and the Tricksters Queen. Alannas daughter Aly wants to become, like her father, a spy for the crown. But nun would let her. Only after she was captured by a pirate raiding party and sold as a slave did the Trickster god come forth with a deal to make. Accepting the deal, Aly has to protect the family from unknown danger to that one will become a Queen and the Trickster God would be put back in his thrown.

All the books above are all based with 10 to 20 years of each other and all have the same charactors pretty much.

The last 8 books are based in the same time peroid but with compleatly mew people and a compleatly new land. The Circle of Magic Quortet. The Circle opens Quortet. All 8 are based on 4 people or kids who have extrodionary magic.

Knew I would have to edit...

[[Edited by Alvanna on Wednesday August 17, 2005 3:26 PM]]
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Eat, Drink and be Marry for tomarrow ye diet!

If
2(x-1)-3(3x+1)=-6(x-5)
and all and all it equals 28, my only question is: Whats this got to do with me?
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Aaron
RE: Favorite Author

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Monday October 10, 2005 1:26 AM
Hmm, I claim my slef well read but many authors that have been stated I do not know of, and many works stated I have at best heard referenced once or twice before by those whom I hold to not be a good choice in readings.

Tolkien I know, and he is good but I wouldnt rate him anywhere near my favorite. Hemmingway I saw stated and I guess its all the works I had to do reports on in English classes that ruined him for me. Beowolf I despise only because of the dispute over who wrote it.

Steven King is alright as well, but I find over rated.
Sir Authur Quillar has some decent writings too, alittle work to get sucked into though.

Robert Louis Stevenson is a grand author, any book of his which I have read has never let me down and sent my imagination soring with possibilities of what if that were me in that situation.

Who I find to be another great author and my favorite is Louis Lamour. He writes western tales and novels. His most famous or well known is the Sacketts series. It was even turned into a TV show kinda like how Little House on the Prairie was. I have a leather bound autographed set of some of his works which I never get tired of reading.
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"As the LORD lives, and as you yourself live, I will be with you."
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Avenging_Angel
RE: Favorite Author


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Sunday October 16, 2005 4:24 PM
I can't really pick a favourite author, however, some I like:

China Mieville-
His books....are amazing. The setting, especially for fans of steampunk like myself, will knock you out of your socks.

Elizabeth Haydon
Sara Douglass
Neil Gaiman
Terry Pratchett
Megan Whalen Turner wrote one of my favourite books of all time, "The Thief"....yet its sequel was a piece of crap. Alas.
Raymond E. Feist (especially the Riftwar Legacy and Faerie Tale)
There are more, but I can't think of them right now....


QUOTED  Richard A. Knaak


If you like Knaak's Warcraft works, he also wrote a three-book graphic novel series in that setting that I hear is very good: [link]
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Pillage
RE: Favorite Author

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Sunday October 16, 2005 9:20 PM
Mmmm, favourite author, huh? That's one helluva tricky question for me to answer, being the kind who stands at an ice cream truck for two hours, hesitating to myself, then go 'Uh, I'll have an ice cream thanks.'

Foremost, I'd have to say Stephen King. The Gunslinger got me absolutely hooked onto his work, and he'll always be one of my favourites.

Then there's the other legend of the late 20th Century, as far as American authors go. Tom Clancy. I guess I have a soft spot for any type of entertainment having to do with warfare, on any time period. While it involves picking enemies off from fifty metres off, the modern age is probably one of the most personal and fascinating time periods as far as warfare goes. But that's for another thread.

Ernest Hemingway. Sheer genius, with a rightly immortal series of works.

Mark Twain. Even at the height of his career, half his work was considered meagre in comparison to Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn by the masses. Silly Americans

Anthony Burgess needs a mention, just for A Clockwork Orange. Though I haven't read anything else by him.

Homer - whether he was a man or an entire region of Greece, The Iliad is incredible.


That's mostly all I can think of for now.
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hi iam new lol
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AnimusAniKorSaxcian
RE: Favorite Author
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Monday August 21, 2006 10:39 PM
Favorite Author, well this all depends on genre for me kinda and even then I have more than one.

For instance I love Satire, and some of the ones who greatly stick out are Aldous Huxely and George Orwell ofcourse with A Brave New World and teh revisited novel, and Orwell's 1984, and Animal Farm.

Where as in Fantasy/SciFi I have througly enjoyed RA Salvatores works in the Star Wars Expanded Galaxy novels, and Terry Brooks also. My problem with both of them is their styles are a lil' too simple and dont grasp me as much.

Now another simple style writer yet holds a fascinating tale is CS Lewis of course.

To add to that list is the writer of teh Lost Years of Merlin Series TA Barron.

huxely and Orwell in my eyes have better writing styles where as those other have great tales but lack the sophisticate style.
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Kitiara
RE: Favorite Author


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Thursday August 24, 2006 12:48 AM
I have to say for those who have never read real Australian literature try Elliott Perlmann's "Seven Types of Ambiguity". Best damn book I ever read.

And I thought all us Aussies were fuckwits. Maybe it's just me
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Anyone you can describe as chipper is to be avoided. You never know when they'll crack. Eventually, they're gonna start gnawing on the nearest thing they can, whether it's a hood ornament or wristwatch, wrist still attached; a moment when that uniform they've made for themselves breaks down and they fall to pieces, right out of it. Give me the life-haters any day. They'll play you straight. -Oobie
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